Monthly Archives: January 2011

Fixing OpenOffice/Libreoffice/Neo Office defective JRE on Mac

Recently, I’ve had to fix defective JRE (java Runtime Environments) for 2 different machines running OpenOffice. I had trouble trying to fix this at first, but it’s actually relatively simple to solve. Here’s how to do it.

Pre-notes: OpenOffice requires the Java Runtime Environment to fully work. A defective JRE could result from a bad installation, or updating while Java is actually in use (this happened to me the first time, never install Java while OpenOffice is running). This will work for NeoOffice and LibreOffice as well. The first 2 steps are pretty commonplace, so if you’ve already attempted to reinstall Java and/or OpenOffice, skip down to step 3 for other methods.

Enough talk, more solution!

1: Attempt to reinstall Java:
Apple normally provides the updates, though with the last Java update for 10.6, they have shifted Java support to Oracle (the company that owns Java). You can redownload a version of Java from the Apple website at this time. Here is the link for Snow Leopard (10.6):
http://support.apple.com/kb/dl972

2: Reinstall OpenOffice: If Java still is malfunctioning with OpenOffice, reinstall the program itself. A connection between the 2 programs may have gone bad somehow. Here’s the link from CNET.com:
http://download.cnet.com/OpenOffice-org/3000-18483_4-10209910.html?tag=mncol;1

3. Repair Permissions: For me, neither of those steps worked, but they’re good starting places. What did work was a permissions repair. To perform one, go to your “Applications” folder, open up the folder inside labeled “Utilities”, and then open the program labeled Disk Utility.
After doing that, select your internal hard drive (likely labeled with the amount of space on your drive, with the brand name), and open the tab that says “First Aid”. At the bottom of the window, hit the button that says “Verify Disk Permissions”, and let it run. Likely there will be one or two error with Java in the error name. Once it is finished verifying, hit “Fix Disk Permissions” and let it run.
Once it is done, you should be able to open OpenOffice and get back to work.

4: If all else fails: Before I figured this out, I did realize that NeoOffice, or the new LibreOffice would work in the meantime. They both run off the same code as OpenOffice, so most of the files you made in one should come cleanly into the other.

If you want a video of this tutorial, let me know. And if you liked this, tend me an email at easyosx@live.com, comment, subscribe, or look me up on Youtube. Thanks, and good luck typing!

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Games4Mac

Hey guys,

I’ve started a new series called “Games4Mac” (G4M for short), where I show off some games (likely free) for the Mac. Mac may not be a gaming platform, but that doesn’t mean Mac people don’t like having something to goof off with. I’ve already posted the first video on my Youtube channel, so if you have any comments or suggestions for games, feel free to let me know. Sorry for posting this late.
Here’s the link:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H42nMDC_HQE&feature=feedu

Thanks!

Convert OpenOffice Drawings to Pictures

Hey guys, a little quick bit that I made for a friend of mine on how to change OpenOffice Draw files into a regular picture format (JPEG, GIF, etc.).

I am a fan of OpenOffice and open-source, so this was nice to make. Send any questions and tips to easyosx@live.com for more tutorials, tips, and tricks.

Installing RAM in a Macbook Pro

Hope everyone is having a great start to the new year. I’ve got my second video out now, which happens to be my first hardware tutorial. It’s over the installation of RAM into a Macbook Pro, but you can apply the basic principles to most other laptops and Macbook models.

Again, comment and subscribe, to let me know what else you’d like to see. Thanks!

Verizon has the iPhone

I said I’d believe it when I saw it, and now I’ve seen it.  Verizon has confirmed at CES that they will be selling the iPhone 4 starting February 10, 2011.  You can check it out online at Verizon’s site http://www.verizonwireless.com/b2c/splash/iphone.jsp.

Again, this is not the iPhone 5, just the same iPhone that is on AT&T.  You will get the ability to tether your phone (meaning you can turn your iPhone into a wifi hotspot for wifi devices, like your laptop, iPod Touch, etc.) on up to 5 devices.

Verizon is running off a CDMA 3G network (no 4G yet), meaning that you can’t make a phone call and do a web activity (email, surfing, etc) at the same time (though that is being worked on).  Verizon also doesn’t have an exclusive CDMA contract, meaning that AT&T will still be selling the iPhone, and other CDMA networks may be getting the iPhone soon (Sprint, for example).

You will need to sign up for the Verizon iPhone on the Verizon website, a 2 year contract with Verizon, and a data plan (which as of this moment you can get either tiered data or unlimited).  It will be $199 for the 16 gig model and $299 for the 32 gig model, but Verizon is offering no early incentives to switch from AT&T, or from one Verizon phone to another.  You will be able to to go into a Verizon or Apple store on February 10th to pick up your preorder iPhone or just one straight off the store shelves.

For more questions, see the Verizon Wireless page in the link above and remember to comment and subscribe.  This is EasyOSX, signing off.

Update: Current Verizon Wireless customers can begin preordering on February 3, and everyone else on the 10th.

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